In recent years, it has become well-known that people aren’t always leaving their jobs but rather their bosses, who fail to manage their organization effectively. Let’s be honest, we all have seen such leaders.

Very few people are fortunate to get a good boss who is an inspirational combination of mentor and friend. There arises an interesting question: If you are passionate about the job, why should you be drifted away by their behavior?

Rather than running off and beginning from scratch again, you can learn to ‘manage up’ your boss.

This is required to stop diverting your mind from their behavior and be consistent in your career progress. If the leader in question is unhelpful or harmful, here are some tips on how to handle such issues.

Accrediting Themselves Only

You’ve put a lot of effort into your work, but ultimately, all the recognition goes to the manager. How painful is that?

These kinds of leaders are hard to deal with. Their achievement comes on the back of the effort of other people.

It will be a diplomatic approach to confront them. So it is better to let your team know what you were responsible for producing before they have a chance to steal your boon.

Disrespect

You always need feedback for your work. A good leader always comes up with future expectations and needs. But some leaders only put you down, without giving any constructive criticism.

If they don’t come up with ideas or expectations, you can take steps to prevent berating. You can wait until they are over their harangue, and discuss later when the situation is calmer.

Micro-Management

While leaders have authority over supervision, that should not permit them to supervise or proof-read every detail.

This makes you feel like you’re under the thumb of an insecure leader or a control freak.

Communication is the best key for micro-managers. So, instead of doing anything by surprise, explain to them what you’re doing and why. You can also share updates and a progress sheet. Make them feel more responsible and capable.

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Mistreatment

There is no such place for an abusive or bullying leader. Nobody should be made to feel uncomfortable or like they must compromise.

Many companies have such leaders, but you can inform your HR and teammates.

It is still better to collect some documented proof to let someone know what is going on, especially if it continues for a long time. Don’t look at it as a typical issue or a consequence of the workplace, and learn to raise your voice.

Non-Perceptible

After every successful project, there is a strong support team. Few have a terrible habit of not exchanging words of appreciation. Real leaders recognize that they could be in trouble if groups abandoned them.

Team members shouldn’t forget to ask for feedback as well. Complimenting your boss never goes out of the style. This uplifts their confidence and makes them feel comfortable.

Playing Among Favorites

Sadly, it is human nature to get attached to some people than others with similar vibes. This can lead to a problem for leaders when they favor one employee or promotes them on preference, not performance.

It might not work to complain, so keep a keen eye on your progress and schedule your career goals in alignment with others. At last, this could be the best action at coming out ahead.

Be Cautious

Poor leaders and managers are present in many areas. Some are worse than others, but there is always a lighter solution before you throw any actions and go somewhere.

Be cautious though. At the least, maintain a professional relationship which should be fine to have an excellent work-life balance.

How Can You Handle Annoying Aspects of Leaders?

If you have ideas you feel like sharing that might be helpful to readers, share them in the comments section below. Thanks!

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Vikash Kumar
Vikash Kumar working as a manager at a custom application development company Tatvasoft. Apart from his profession he also likes to share insights on Entrepreneurship, Leadership and other managerial level views.