As a leader, communicating change effectively is definitely an asset in the workplace – and life in general.

One way to improve your communication skills is learn from leaders who have mastered the art of communication.

Their techniques, ideas, and knowledge they’ve chosen to share are valuable for many reasons. People at all levels of experience can acquire new skills, discover new ideas, and even change their mindset based on the experience and expertise of these three practiced leaders.

Start From Within Yourself

Communicating Change quotes

Dr. Mary Kay Whitaker; professor, leadership consultant and author, believes that true leadership – and therefore effective communication – begins with yourself. You must recognize the fact that you can’t change other people – only yourself.

Your communication techniques should follow the same philosophy – lead by example, and your team, audience, or community will follow.

Focusing on the target at hand and believing in your company, and its objectives is another important technique of Dr. Mary Kay Whitaker’s leadership strategies.

A team or community is only as focused as their leader, after all, so if the leader isn’t on track, the rest of the team won’t be either.

The Key Takeaway

Ultimately, you have to believe in the goals and concepts you are communicating; if so, that belief will come through in your words and actions,  and you’ll be able to inspire others to action.

Focus On Inspiring People Across Channels

Software entrepreneur and Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff built a multi-billion empire through telling his software company’s stories via multiple channels and embracing social media.

“The future of communicating with customers rests in engaging with them through every possible channel: phone, email, chat, Web, and social networks. Customers are discussing the company’s products and brand in real time. Companies need to join the conversation.”
– Marc Benioff

Embrace the variety of options and the transparency of the digital web, even when you are communicating offline.

Know that today, everyone has smart phones with video cameras and voice recording capabilities readily at hand – so you need to craft the message and inspiring story for them to share with their networks, as well as your immediate audience.

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The Key Takeaway

Think of your team or community as journalists who are going to filter your message through their own perception, and speak to them in the voice (and on the channels) they already want to hear.

Stay Humble and Lead By Example

Legendary UCLA basketball coach John Wooden was known for being soft-spoken in comparison to his typically loud, somewhat arrogant coaching peers.

However, that commanded him more respect from his players, the media, and the public. He led by example, first and foremost.

“Never try to be better than someone else. Learn from others, and try to be the best you can be. Success is the by-product of that preparation.”
– John Wooden

What you can learn from Coach Wooden is that communicating effectively doesn’t mean being the loudest person in the room, or talking the most. Sometimes providing a positive example and simply listening are the most powerful methods of communication of all.

The Key Takeaway

Of course, there are other shared qualities of successful leaders. For instance, they typically are open to honest feedback and constructive criticism – but they also have utmost conviction in their path, ideas, and their abilities.

And that leads to strong communication skills that will be useful in all aspects of life.

How Do You Communicate Change?

If you have ideas you feel like sharing that might be helpful to readers, share them in the comments section below. Thanks!

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Hillary Smith
Hilary is honored to have had the opportunity to share a post
with the audience of AboutLeaders.com. In addition to discussing the
value of communication skills, her writing also covers business
telecommunications, marketing, virtual technology and visual customer
service. Follow her on Twitter: @HilaryS33